Radiometric dating answers Chat with aunty now

Radioactive rocks offer a similar “clock.” Radioactive atoms, such as uranium (the parent isotopes), decay into stable atoms, such as lead (the daughter isotopes), at a measurable rate.To date a radioactive rock, geologists first measure the “sand grains” in the top glass bowl (the parent radioisotope, such as uranium-238 or potassium-40).With the help of this growing body of information, creation geologists hope to piece together a better understanding of the precise sequence of events in earth’s history, from Creation Week to the Flood and beyond.Many accept radiometric dating methods as proof that the earth is millions of years old, in contrast to the biblical timeline.Yet few people know how radiometric dating works or bother to ask what assumptions drive the conclusions.So let’s take a closer look and see how reliable this dating method really is.

While the clocks cannot yield absolute dates for rocks, they can provide relative ages that allow us to compare any two rock units and know which one formed first.There are certain kinds of atoms in nature that are unstable and spontaneously change (decay) into other kinds of atoms.For example, uranium will radioactively decay through a series of steps until it becomes the stable element lead. The original element is referred to as the parent element (in these cases uranium and potassium), and the end result is called the daughter element (lead and argon).The straightforward reading of Scripture reveals that the days of creation () were literal days and that the earth is just thousands of years old and not billions.There appears to be a fundamental conflict between the Bible and the reported ages given by radioisotope dating.